Angel Air Records

Angel Air is an English independent record label established in February 1997, specialising in reissues of classic pop and rock albums originally issued in the 1960s and 1970s (and latterly new albums from known artists up to the 21st century). It was formed by Peter and Shirley Purnell.

Today the Purnells also own CeeDee Music UK which publishes over 3,000 songs, and CeeDee Management which counts Mott The Hoople members the late Overend Watts, Verden Allen and the late Dale Griffin and Saxon members Graham Oliver and Steve Dawson amongst its management clients.

Since 1997 the label has issued over 500 albums and 30 DVD titles. Its 500th release was the Stackridge live album The Final Bow two CD set.

On 18 February 2019 the Purnells sold their shares in Angel Air Records and CeeDee Music UK to father and son team Brian and Terry Adams trading as The Store For Music Ltd. The Purnell’s continue to own CeeDee Management Ltd who deal with music artist business affairs and royalty collections.

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Arista Records

Arista Records, Inc. (/əˈrɪstə/) is an American record label owned by Sony Music Entertainment, a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, the North American division of the Japanese conglomerate Sony. The label was previously handled by Bertelsmann Music Group. The label was founded in 1974 by Clive Davis. Along with Epic Records, RCA Records, and Columbia Records, Arista is one of Sony Music’s four flagship record labels.

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Atlantic Records

atlanticrecords.com

Atlantic Recording Corporation (simply known as Atlantic Records) is an American record label founded in October 1947 by Ahmet Ertegun and Herb Abramson. Over its first 20 years of operation, Atlantic earned a reputation as one of the most important American labels, specializing in jazz, R&B, and soul by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, Ruth Brown and Otis Redding. Its position was greatly improved by its distribution deal with Stax. In 1967, Atlantic became a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, now the Warner Music Group, and expanded into rock and pop music with releases by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Led Zeppelin and Yes.

In 2004, Atlantic and its sister label Elektra were merged into Atlantic Records Group. Craig Kallman is the chairman of Atlantic. Ahmet Ertegun served as founding chairman until his death on December 14, 2006, at age 83.

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Big Tree Records

Big Tree Records was a record label founded by Doug Morris in 1970. It was best known for releases by Lobo, England Dan & John Ford Coley, Brownsville Station, Johnny Rivers, Dave and Ansel Collins, Canadian band April Wine, and British R&B group Hot Chocolate.

The label was initially distributed by Ampex Records from 1970 to 1971, and then by Bell Records from 1972 to 1973. Morris sold the label to Atlantic Records in 1974, and became co-chairman of Atlantic. The label continued to operate as a subsidiary of Atlantic, until Atlantic shut the label down in 1980.

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Collectables Records

Collectables is a reissue record label founded in 1980 by Jerry Greene. Greene was previously associated with New York City’s Times Square Record Shop, Philadelphia’s Record Museum retail chain, and the Lost Nite and Crimson record labels.

Collectables is the largest independently owned (and family-operated) reissue label in the United States. It maintains a catalogue of over 3,400 active titles on compact disc, with thousands of additional titles available on vinyl. It has released hundreds of recordings from the vaults of major labels, such as Columbia, Atlantic, RCA, Capitol, Vee-Jay and others, making many available on CD for the first time. Genres found on Collectables include rock, jazz, comedy, blues, doo-wop, and funk.

Collectables publishes the Priceless Collection series of budget compilations. Many of the label’s other releases combine the contents of two original LPs on a single CD. The company also manufactures multi-CD compilation box sets sold exclusively through retailers such as QVC, Costco and Sam’s Club.

Collectables is one of a group of companies, including Alpha Video, Gotham Distributing Corporation and the e-commerce website OLDIES.com, owned and operated by Jerry Greene and the Greene family.

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DJ Yella

The cover for the Yella’s first single “Slice” (1984) with the Wreckin’ Cru

Antoine Carraby (born December 11, 1967), better known by his stage name DJ Yella, is an American DJ, rapper, record producer and film director from Los Angeles, California. Yella was passionate about music from a young age. He grew up listening to funk music and learned to play the drums. As a teenager, Yella performed at various clubs of Los Angeles. He was a member of the World Class Wreckin’ Cru along with Dr. Dre. He later joined the pioneering gangsta rap group N.W.A (originally composed of Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, MC Ren, Arabian Prince and Eazy-E).

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Dr. Dre

Dr. Dre in November 2011

Andre Romelle Young (born February 18, 1965), known professionally as Dr. Dre, is an American rapper, songwriter, audio engineer, record producer, and entrepreneur. He is the founder and CEO of Aftermath Entertainment and Beats Electronics, and previously co-founded, co-owned, and was the president of Death Row Records. Dr. Dre began his career as a member of the World Class Wreckin’ Cru in 1985 and later found fame with the gangsta rap group N.W.A. The group popularized explicit lyrics in hip hop to detail the violence of street life. During the early 1990s, Dre was credited as a key figure in the crafting and popularization of West Coast G-funk, a subgenre of hip hop characterized by a synthesizer foundation and slow, heavy beats.

Dre’s solo debut studio album The Chronic (1992), released under Death Row Records, made him one of the best-selling American music artists of 1993. It earned him a Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance for the single “Let Me Ride”, as well as several accolades for the single “Nuthin’ but a ‘G’ Thang”. That year, he produced Death Row labelmate Snoop Doggy Dogg’s debut album Doggystyle and mentored producers such as his step-brother Warren G (leading to the multi-platinum debut Regulate…G Funk Era in 1994) and Snoop Dogg’s cousin Daz Dillinger (leading to the double-platinum debut Dogg Food by Tha Dogg Pound in 1995). In 1996, Dr. Dre left Death Row Records to establish his own label, Aftermath Entertainment. He produced a compilation album, Dr. Dre Presents the Aftermath, in 1996, and released a solo album, 2001, in 1999.

During the 2000s, Dre focused on producing other artists, occasionally contributing vocals. He signed Eminem in 1998 and 50 Cent in 2002, and co-produced their albums. He has produced albums for and overseen the careers of many other rappers, including 2Pac, the D.O.C., Snoop Dogg, Xzibit, Knoc-turn’al, the Game, Kendrick Lamar, and Anderson Paak. Dre has also had acting roles in movies such as Set It Off, The Wash and Training Day. He has won six Grammy Awards, including Producer of the Year, Non-Classical. Rolling Stone ranked him number 56 on the list of 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. He was the second-richest figure in hip hop as of 2018 with an estimated net worth of $800 million.

Accusations of Dre’s violence against women have been widely publicized. Following his assault of television host Dee Barnes, he was fined $2,500, given two years’ probation, ordered to undergo 240 hours of community service, and given a spot on an anti-violence public service announcement. A civil suit was settled out of court. In 2015, Michel’le, the mother of one of his children, accused him of domestic violence during their time together as a couple. Their abusive relationship is portrayed in her 2016 biopic Surviving Compton: Dre, Suge & Michel’le. Lisa Johnson, the mother of three of Dr. Dre’s children, stated that he beat her many times, including while she was pregnant. She was granted a restraining order against him. Former labelmate Tairrie B claimed that Dre assaulted her at a party in 1990, in response to her track “Ruthless Bitch”.

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Drill ‘n’ bass

Drill ‘n’ bass (also known as fungle or spunk jazz) is a subgenre of electronic music which developed in the mid-1990s as IDM artists began experimenting with elements of drum and bass, breakbeat, and jungle music. Artists utilized powerful audio software programs and deployed frenzied, irregular beats that often discouraged dancing. The style was often interpreted as having a lightly parodic relationship with the dance styles that inspired it.

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Hardcore HipHop

Hardcore hip hop (also hardcore rap) is a genre of hip hop music that developed through the East Coast hip hop scene in the 1980s. Pioneered by such artists as Run-DMC, Schoolly D, Boogie Down Productions and Public Enemy, it is generally characterized by anger, aggression and confrontation.

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Ice Cube

Ice Cube in January 2014

O’Shea Jackson (born June 15, 1969), known professionally as Ice Cube, is an American rapper, actor, and filmmaker. His lyrics on N.W.A’s 1988 album Straight Outta Compton contributed to gangsta rap’s widespread popularity, and his political rap solo albums of 1990 and 1991 were critically and commercially successful. He has also had an active film career since the early 1990s. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of N.W.A in 2016.

A native of Los Angeles, Jackson formed his first rap group called C.I.A. in 1986. In 1987, with Eazy-E and Dr. Dre, he formed the pioneering gangsta rap group N.W.A. As its lead rapper, he wrote some of Dre’s and most of Eazy’s lyrics on Straight Outta Compton, a landmark album that shaped West Coast hip hop’s early identity and helped differentiate it from East Coast rap. N.W.A was also known for their violent lyrics, threatening to attack abusive police and innocent civilians alike, which stirred controversy. After a monetary dispute over the group’s management by Eazy-E and Jerry Heller, Cube left N.W.A in late 1989, teaming with New York artists and launching a solo rap career. His first two solo albums, AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted (1990) and Death Certificate (1991), were critically acclaimed.

Ice Cube entered cinema by playing Doughboy in director John Singleton’s feature debut Boyz n the Hood, a 1991 drama named after a 1987 rap song[2] that Cube wrote. Cube also cowrote and starred in the 1995 comedy film Friday; “coarse and ribald”, it premised a successful franchise and reshaped his persona into a friendly movie star. His directorial debut was the 1998 film The Player’s Club. By 2020, his acting roles included about 40 films, among them the 1999 war comedy Three Kings, family comedies like the Barbershop series, and buddy cop comedies 21 Jump Street, 22 Jump Street, and Ride Along. He was an executive producer of many of these films, as well as of the 2015 biopic Straight Outta Compton.

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